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I know this post has a weird title, but blocking hats and hoods can also cause a bit of confusion and puzzlement. I wish I had a dollar for every time someone asked me how to block either a hat or a hood. Granted, there are some hat shapes that block well if you simply lay them flat. Others–well, not so much. Here are some hints for those troublemakers:

Hats

When blocking hats, I like to shape the crown by stuffing it with plastic grocery bags (an alternative would be a styrofoam ball from a craft store).

(c) Hayley Andrews

(c) Hayley Andrews

Then I set the hat on top of a mason jar or tall can of vegetables (with the crown stuffing still in place).

(c) Hayley Andrews

(c) Hayley Andrews

Depending on the style and fabric of my hat, I may dry my hat flat and then spritz it down with water to shape the crown as described above. With others, I use this as my primary method of blocking. (Note: Spritzing is also a great way to refresh a hat after it’s been in storage.)

Hoods

Hoods are a little bit trickier–especially if they have a textured stitch pattern. I generally use one of the following options:

  1. Block the body of the sweater without trying to shape the hood perfectly. After the body is dry, maneuver the piece so that the hood is flat (either the left side or the right side is facing up), spritz with water, and let dry. This method is best for textured pieces. If necessary, you can pin it out before you spritz it.
  2. Stuff the hood with plastic grocery bags and/or a tailor’s ham to shape. This method works well for plain hoods.
(c) Hayley Andrews

(c) Hayley Andrews

As lazy as I am, I usually start with Option 2, and if it doesn’t look quite right, then I use the spritz technique described in Option 1 (and if it does look okay, then I’ve just saved myself an extra step).


 

Well, now you know my hat- and hood-blocking secrets! What about you? Do you have a favorite method for blocking hats? Please share below!