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This week’s post is anything but philosophical, but before I get into it, I would like to give credit where credit is due. The clever Meredith, of These Hands of Mine, first introduced me to the technique I’m about to show you.

Of course, we all hate it when we accidentally split our yarn while knitting, and this should be avoided as much as possible. There is one specific situation, however, in which splitting yarn is actually useful and desirable, and that involves weaving in ends.

I must admit, I was a bit smug in the end-weaving department (I usually use a duplicate stitch to weave), until I realized that none of my creations to date had been made for children or heavy laundering. Clearly, something sturdy is needed to withstand the rigors of life with certain recipients, but what might that something be? Enter the split thread.

The split thread begins with a single pass in one direction, working through the back side of a particular row (or a seam selvage), like so…

(c) Hayley Andrews

(c) Hayley Andrews

…and then continues with a pass in the opposite direction, working back into the threads from the first pass. (Note: This is best accomplished with a reasonably sharp tapestry or crewel needle.)

(c) Hayley Andrews

(c) Hayley Andrews

One thing you’ll notice about this technique is that it’s very firm, yet it doesn’t distort the shape of the fabric on the front side. And, if you feel like adding an even greater measure of security, you can make a third pass in the same direction as the first pass. Nowadays, I almost always use this type of weave for children’s items, as well as for pieces made from bulky yarn, since it doesn’t usually create a great deal of bulk in the fabric.

Well, that it’s for this week, folks! What about you? Have you ever used this method to weave in ends? What did you think? Please feel free to share in the comments section below.